Here we have a list of aloes for you to browse through. Each section contains information on its specific aloe and is also accompanied by images. Enjoy!

Aloe aculeata

Aloe aculeata

As the specific name aculeata says, it is prickly! The big single rosettes of Aloe aculeata are in winter adorned with impressive yellow or orange inflorescences. Single raceme flowers appear on the younger plants and branched panicles on mature ones. This Aloe is common in parts of the northern provinces of South Africa, particularly in Mpumalanga and Limpopo near Lydenburg and Ohrigstad, as well as over the border in Zimbabwe and Botswana.

Aloe africana

Aloe africana

Aloe africana, the Uitenhage aloe, is a tall, single-stemmed plant reaching 2 m to 4 m in height (SA Tree List No. 28.2). Occasionally a plant will branch from the base. The dry leaf remains persist below the green rosettes on the generally erect stem.

Aloe alooides

Aloe alooides

Aloe alooides, the Graskop aloe, grows a single stem with long light-green, droopy leaves. It becomes up to 2 m tall (SA Tree List No. 28.3). Up to five single racemes of yellow flowers may grow in season from the leaf rosette of a thriving plant.

Aloe arborescens

Aloe arborescens

Aloe arborescens branches much, forming broad and tall shrubs or trees of more than 2 m in both dimensions. Arborescens means tree-like in Latin.

Aloe aristata

Aloe aristata

Aloe aristata, known colloquially as the lace aloe, is a dwarf aloe that occurs naturally in a large inland distribution. This area comprises central South Africa from the Karoo, Eastern Cape, the entire Lesotho and adjacent areas of the Free State and KwaZulu-Natal.

Aloe brevifolia

Aloe brevifolia

Aloe brevifolia is one of the dwarf aloes bearing branching clusters of compact rosettes. The clump that develops from offshoots at the base forms a shallow dome in mature plants that grow well.

Aloe broomii

Aloe broomii

Aloe broomii is most of the time a large, single-stemmed plant, occasionally branching at the base or higher up, but not often as much as seen here. Commonly classified among the stemless aloes, an erect stem of up to 1 m does sometimes occur. Such a stem is not directly visible, for the remains of the old dry leaves persist on it down to the base. The typical height reached by a mature plant is around 1,5 m.

Aloe burgersfortensis

Aloe burgersfortensis

Aloe burgersfortensis is found along the Steelpoort River, the Spekboom River, the Waterval River and in the vicinity of the towns Lydenburg, Barberton and Burgersfort. It grows in low lying, hot, dry areas.

Aloe cameronii

Aloe cameronii

Aloe cameronii, commonly red aloe or Cameron’s Ruwari aloe, is not indigenous to South Africa, but a tropical African species found from Zimbabwe to a Malawi. The plant in picture was photographed in the Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden during January.

Aloe castanea

Aloe castanea

Aloe castanea received the specific epithet of castanea for the eponymous colour designation, chestnut. The red-brown perianths have inner segments broader than the outer three free ones. The inner three anthers as well as the outer ones are in turn excerted.

Aloe chabaudii

Aloe chabaudii

The form of Aloe chabaudii found in the eastern parts of the Limpopo and Mpumalanga as well as in northern KwaZulu-Natal and Swaziland is sometimes called A. chabaudii var. chabaudii. Two other forms, viz. A. chabaudii var. mlanjeana (Malawi) and A. chabaudii var. verekeri(Zimbabwe) have also been recorded. Variability of these plants does occur across the overall distribution of A. chabaudii, raising questions about the recognition of varieties.

Aloe chortolirioides var. woolliana

Aloe chortolirioides var. woolliana

Aloe chortolirioides var. woolliana is a grass aloe occurring naturally in parts of the Mpumalanga and Limpopo provinces. It tends to form clumps of rosettes through branching. The length of the flowers and the bigger leaves (than the usual very thin, grassy ones), indicate that this plant is A

Aloe claviflora

Aloe claviflora

Quite a sight, Aloe claviflora in full bloom! Apart from the kraalaalwyn common name, the plant has acquired further Afrikaans names in its inland distribution area of the Great Karoo, western Free State, Northern Cape and Namibia:

Aloe comptonii

Aloe comptonii

Aloe comptonii is one of the creeping aloes. This means that it has one or more rosettes facing up, stems of varying length lying on the ground. There is a difference between stemless A. comptonii plants in the east of the species distribution in the Karoo and Eastern Cape as far as Uitenhage, and ones with stems in the west, the Little Karoo and Great Karoo as far west as Montagu.

Aloe cryptopoda

Aloe cryptopoda

Aloe cryptopoda is a stemless aloe with a large, dense rosette of deep green leaves. Leaf margins have small dark brown to black spines. The plants grow in bushveld grass, among rocks and shrubs. The species distribution is widespread in the north of South Africa and several neighbouring countries, up to Malawi.

Aloe dolomitica

Aloe dolomitica

Aloe dolomitica may be just a discarded synonym for A. vryheidensis as appears to be the official position. It occurs in the north of South Africa, only in the Limpopo province, growing a single stem of up to 2 m in height. A. vryheidensis is a stemless or short-stemmed plant growing in KwaZulu-Natal near Vryheid and in Mpumalanga near Barberton

Aloe dorothea, a hybrid

Aloe dorothea, a hybrid

Aloe hybrids in cultivation are increasing in numbers and diversity well beyond the range of those occurring spontaneously in nature. Where aloes of different species grow in close proximity to each other and flower at the same time, hybrids may occur naturally. The features of specific aloes are increasingly considered by horticulturists for producing targeted outcomes.

Size, flower colour, leaf and overall plant shape are some of the

Aloe ferox

Aloe ferox

This Aloe ferox plant has a reduced rosette from the harvest that was made of mature green leaves at the base of the rosette. The short stub remains can be seen where leaves have been removed for collecting the juice.

Aloe fouriei

Aloe fouriei

Aloe fouriei has a small natural habitat in northern Mpumalanga near Lydenburg. It flowers in summer and has a stem, unlike many of the other grass aloes. The leaves are long and slender with some spots on the upper surface.

Aloe gariepensis

Aloe gariepensis

In flower Aloe gariepensis can be an imposing presence in the usually bleak, exposed, short scrub of the far Northern Cape. Look for it from Keimoes to the Gariep mouth, on both sides of the river. The specimen in picture has a short stem covered in desiccated foliage, typical of mature plants of the species.

Aloe glauca

Aloe glauca

Aloe glauca, in Afrikaans commonly known as the blouaalwyn (blue aloe), is a stemless or short-stemmed leaf succulent that often branches sparingly from near the base, reaching heights of 90 cm to 1,35 m.

Aloe globuligemma

Aloe globuligemma

Aloe globuligemma has slender procumbent stems that creep and root to establish a clump of rosettes, often in the bushveld semi-shade. The vigorous winter flowering is spectacular. Long arrays of rose-coloured buds, whitish towards the tube mouths are quite unlike other aloe flowers.

Aloe graminicola

Aloe graminicola

This Kenyan Aloe is popular with many gardeners. The photo was taken in the Gibraltar Botanical Garden where the conditions for growing many Aloespecies are particularly favourable.

Aloe grandidentata

Aloe grandidentata

This member of the spotted or maculate group of aloes is widespread in the South African dry interior. Aloe grandidentata naturally forms colonies by growing underground stolons or suckers spreading sideways. The name grandidentatameans "with large teeth". This may be seen as somewhat overstated, although the leaf edge teeth can be quite stout and robust.

Aloe greatheadii

Aloe greatheadii

Aloe greatheadii var. davyana, previously A. davyana, is common in Gauteng. It is noticed mostly during the winter months when thousands of flowers appear in the grass. They are often found in large groups in poorly managed veld.

Aloe greenii

Aloe greenii

Aloe greenii grows up to twenty lance-shaped to linear leaves that attenuate gradually and recurve slightly towards their tips. Oblong to elliptic white leaf markings are scattered in varying density along both leaf surfaces, sometimes becoming confluent in irregularly shaped transversal bands. Leaves become about 50 cm long and 8 cm wide at the base. The marginal leaf prickles are hard, sharp and pinkish brown.

Aloe hereroensis

Aloe hereroensis

Aloe hereroensis, in Afrikaans commonly the vlakte-aalwyn (plains aloe) or sandaalwyn (sand aloe), usually grows a single rosette, but may branch into clumps of up to three similar ones. The lower leaf surface is characteristically spotted, especially in young plants, whilst the upper one is clear of such spots, distinguishing the species from the maculate aloes.

Aloe humilis

Aloe humilis

Aloe humilis, sometimes commonly called the dwarf hedgehog aloe, is a miniature stemless leaf succulent growing a dense clump of up to 10 leaf rosettes. Humilis means lowly or humble in Latin.

Aloe inermis

Aloe inermis

Aloe inermis comes mainly from Yemen. It is clearly happy on The Rock!

Aloe integra

Aloe integra

Aloe integra is a small grass aloe bearing yellow flowers, often shortly after the winter grass fires. The flowering season changes according to the timing of the all too regular fires. The plants grow solitary or in small groups. Older plants clump from several stemless leaf rosettes

Aloe jucunda

Aloe jucunda

Aloe jucunda is indigenous to an area close to Hargeisa, a town in Somalia, adjoining savannah grassland. The plant typically occurs in woodland that is also prevalent in the region. It grows well in moderate temperatures and partial sunlight.

Aloe juncea

Aloe juncea

Aloe juncea is not a South African plant although it is an attractive exotic, increasingly seen in gardens and containers here. The plant branches from the base to form several stems covered in short, thick and broad leaves, triangular in shape. The description of ground cover is apt insofar as the plant is low-growing, reaching about 15

Aloe karasbergensis

Aloe karasbergensis

Aloe karasbergensis, previously known as A. striata subsp. karasbergensis, is a bulky, stemless or occasionally short-stemmed leaf succulent that branches, growing up to 20 rosettes. Especially when there are fewer, one rosette may be over 1 m in diameter and the plant in flower up to 1,8 m tall.

Aloe khamiesensis

Aloe khamiesensis

Aloe khamiesensis is a single-stemmed or two-branched succulent tree of up to 3 m in height (SA Tree List No.29.3). Dead leaves tend to persist below the live leaf rosette; only the lowest stem part sheds them. Some say that the bare bottom stem parts are caused by animals rubbing the dead leaves off, suggesting that they would persist to ground level where no interference had taken place. (The phenomenon of dead plant parts persisting on the live plant is known as marcescence.)

Aloe kouebokkeveldensis

Aloe kouebokkeveldensis

The succulent leaves of Aloe kouebokkeveldensis grow in a dense rosette that reminds of that of A. striata. The smooth leaf surfaces have faint signs of longitudinal line markings. The margins are entire without spines, a yellow or reddish cartilaginous rim visible upon them. The leaves taper gradually to their acute tips, the leaf base curving in where it clasps the younger leaves above it.

Aloe lineata var. muirii

Aloe lineata var. muirii

Aloe lineata var. muirii is normally single-stemmed, rarely branched. When branching occurs, it may be low down, but not always. The leaves show longitudinal red lines as the specific name lineata suggests. The leaf margins have prominent red teeth, the blade surfaces are smooth.

Aloe longistyla

Aloe longistyla

Aloe longistyla, commonly called ramenas or Karoo aloe, is a stemless, short-lived leaf succulent, in flower reaching heights around 20 cm.

Aloe maculata

Aloe maculata

The flat-topped (capitate as opposed to conical) raceme of Aloe maculata also occurs in some other spotted, stemless aloes. They include A. affinis, A. petrophila, A. prinslooi, A. swynnertonii, A. umfoloziensis and A. vogtsii. Several of those have much narrower or less spotted leaves and more branches in the panicles. Some also have very localised, small distributions, unlike A. maculata, previously known as A. saponaria. A. maculata was described by Reynolds (1974) as the most variable among the spotted aloes.

Aloe marlothii

Aloe marlothii

Aloe marlothii plants growing well can be expected to reach a height of around 4 m. When the 50 or so leaves are fully fleshed out and become up to 1,5 m long, the size of these plants can be truly imposing.

Aloe melanacantha

Aloe melanacantha

These Aloe melanacantha leaf rosettes were seen in the Goegap Nature Reserve in August. Flowering happens at the end of autumn and early winter but this clump may have skipped a season. The black thorns occur only on leaf margins and the upper part of the keel on the outside surface.

Aloe micracantha

Aloe micracantha

Aloe micracantha, sometimes commonly called the wateraalwyn (water aloe), is a small, but robust grass aloe of the Eastern Cape (Grahamstown to Joubertina). Winter grass fire plays a role in the well-being of the species. The plant, occasionally branched is generally single-stemmed, also short-stemmed from thick, long roots sometimes referred to as fusiform.

Aloe microstigma

Aloe microstigma

The inflorescence of Aloe microstigma is an unbranched, narrow, oblong to conical raceme of up to 1 m. Two or three racemes may grow simultaneously on mature plants in good condition. The buds are red or orange, remaining orange or turning yellow upon opening, as in the specimen in picture. The bicolour form is more prevalent

Aloe mitriformis now called Aloe perfoliata

Aloe mitriformis now called Aloe perfoliata

Aloe mitriformis is one of the Western Cape creeping or trailing aloes. The name has been changed to A. perfoliata. The plant branches repeatedly and sustains leaves only towards the ends of branches. These leaf rosettes are too large and heavy for the thin branches to support in an erect position, leaving the stems procumbent.

Aloe mutabilis

Aloe mutabilis

Aloe mutabilis is closely related to A. arborescens, sometimes classified as just another form. Its spectacular feature is the clinging to steep cliff edges, hanging high above water or over deep, shady ravines. There is said to be a form in Mpumalanga bearing pure red flowers, i.e. the perianths do not turn yellow upon opening

Aloe pearsonii

Aloe pearsonii

Scattered stands of Aloe pearsonii in its stony slope habitat may dominate parts of the vegetation. Some bare patches are in view wherever one looks in this arid land, bigger shrubs being few. Succulent plants that store moisture for the frequent dry periods have head start to grow again as soon as conditions permit.

Aloe peglerae

Aloe peglerae

Aloe peglerae is a stemless Aloe or very nearly so. It normally produces only one leaf rosette per plant. The rosette comprises about 30 leaves that curve inwards to form a compactly rounded shape.

Aloe perfoliata

Aloe perfoliata

Aloe perfoliata, the mitre aloe, has long thin stems, seemingly too weak to keep the dense load of stout leaves erect. This plant is known as one of the creeping aloes with stems that often lie on the ground and just the rosettes at the ends of branches pointing upwards. The stem of the young Kirstenbosch plant in picture has not quite succumbed to gravity yet.

Aloe petricola

Aloe petricola

Aloe petricola grows with a single stemless rosette. The long raceme, typical of younger specimens, has a colour change from red to yellow when the buds open and each perianth transforms from red to a greenish white open flower. The bicolour characteristic is shared with a number of other aloe species.

Aloe pictifolia

Aloe pictifolia

Aloe pictifolia is a small plant from a very limited distribution area. It grows on cliffs in the Kouga Mountains and the Baviaanskloof north of Humansdorp in the Eastern Cape. The plant may grow several rosettes, branching from the base.

Aloe pluridens

Aloe pluridens

Aloe pluridens, commonly the Fransaalwyn (French aloe), is a single-stemmed plant when growing in dense bush, branched from the base or higher up when standing in the open. The typical height is around 2 m to 3 m, occasionally 5 m and rarely 6 m (SA Tree List No. 30.1).

Aloe polyphylla

Aloe polyphylla

The environment within which Aloe polyphylla grows is atypical of southern Africa. The bleak, misty Maluti Mountains of western Lesotho are quite unsuitable for most of the other Aloe species of this generally Aloe rich region. .

Aloe pratensis

Aloe pratensis

Aloe pratensis often branches at the base to produce a clump of thorny and densely leaved rosettes. The leaves are longitudinally lined and spined on the outer surfaces, not the inner ones. The white tubercles at the base of the spines are said to be characteristic of this species. The flowers are characterized by conspicuous bracts below the perianths. Note the colour and shape of the inflorescence.

Aloe pretoriensis

Aloe pretoriensis

Aloe pretoriensis grows a 1 m stem upon which the 40 to 60 leaves of the single rosette are nearly erect when young. They are lanceolate-acuminate, i.e. lance-shaped and tapering to a sharp apex.

Aloe pruinosa

Aloe pruinosa

Aloe pruinosa is a maculate aloe with a much branched inflorescence that only occurs in a limited thorn-bush area in KwaZulu-Natal. The green or purplish upper leaf surface has scattered H-shaped white markings. On the lower surface of the leaf there are more spots than above, oval in shape. The spots are sometimes arranged in linear bands along the leaf surface.

Aloe reynoldsii

Aloe reynoldsii

Aloe pruinosa is a maculate aloe with a much branched inflorescence that only occurs in a limited thorn-bush area in KwaZulu-Natal. The green or purplish upper leaf surface has scattered H-shaped white markings. On the lower surface of the leaf there are more spots than above, oval in shape. The spots are sometimes arranged in linear bands along the leaf surface.

Aloe rupestris

Aloe rupestris

Aloe rupestris, the bottle-brush aloe previously known as A. nitens, is usually single-stemmed growing tall, from 6 m to 8 m in height (SA Tree List No. 30.3). This plant in cultivation in Melbourne, Australia has many small shoots at its base, a feature that is known to occur, although branches of the main stem are rare.

Aloe speciosa

Aloe speciosa

Aloe speciosa is usually a single stem plant with a tall erect trunk on mature plants. This Aloe reaches heights of 6 m. In the rare event of branching, as happened with the pictured specimen, it usually takes place right at the base when the seedlings initially form rosettes. Reynolds presented a photo of a plant with four branches growing near Fort Beaufort (1974).

Aloe striata

Aloe striata

Aloe striata grows from around the Hex River Pass eastwards through the Karoo and Little Karoo scrub until the Eastern Cape around Port Elizabeth and Graaff-Reinet, also northwards into Namibia and eastwards to the Kei River.

Aloe succotrina rosette

Aloe succotrina rosette

Aloe succotrina forms robust clumps of its very attractive rosettes with their erect, grey-green leaves and the light coloured teeth that only occur on the cartilaginous marginal border. The leaves are occasionally spotted. The plant is stemless when young and develops procumbent stems of up to a metre in some mature plants. Flowers are red to pink, blooming on single or once branched conical racemes in late winter.

Aloe suprafoliata

Aloe suprafoliata

Aloe suprafoliata has a botanical name that comes from the distinctive characteristic of the young plant that produces two vertical ranks of opposite, stacked leaves that only spiral into a rosette in maturity after some years.

Aloe thraskii

Aloe thraskii

Gardens along the South African coastline display many outstanding specimens of Aloe thraskii. The common height they reach is around 2 m, but occasionally plants in excess of 4 m are seen. This is one of the recognised South African tree aloes (SA Tree List No. 30.7).

Aloe vanbalenii

Aloe vanbalenii

Aloe vanbalenii is stemless or has short creeping stems among the clump of densely arranged rosettes that commonly develop in favourable growing conditions. It is found in nature in northern KwaZulu-Natal among rocks and sunny outcrops.

Aloe vera

Aloe vera

Aloe vera is a stemless or very short stemmed plant, growing to 60-100 centimetres tall. The leaves are a thick and fleshy green to gray-green. Some also have white flecks on their upper and lower stem surfaces.

In association with:
@ll@bout logo.png

All About... Aloes

For Aloe Enthusiasts by Aloe Enthusiasts